Tanzania, Ruanda, Washed
Tanzania, Ruanda, Washed

Tanzania, Ruanda, Washed

Regular price €9,00
/
Tax included. Shipping calculated at checkout.
-62 in stock

Weight
Processing
Washed
Harvest
October–November 2020
Altitude
1700 m
Variety
Kent, Typica
Scoring
84

Country: Tanzania

Region: Songwe, Mbozi

Agricultural Marketing Cooperative Society (AMCO)

Taste notes - blood orange, blue plum, cacao.

 

This Tanzanian blend contains only peaberries which are an outcome of natural mutation. Instead of two, only one pearl-shaped bean is formed in a coffee cherry. 

 

We collect and process all orders from the webshop every Friday at 15 o’clock*, and ship them on the following Tuesday.

*If you place an order after 15 o’clock on Friday it will be processed the following Friday.

If you have any questions about your order, please contact our customer service via email at webshop@rocketbeanroastery.com.

We respond to customer inquiries within 3 hours on all working days, within working hours (9-18).


Tanzania


Coffee’s roots in Tanzania can be traced via narrative history back to the Haya tribe of Northwest Tanzania in the 16th century. Following German and then British colonial rule, the Tanzanian coffee industry has undergone many transformations and adjustments to create the most equal, profitable and high-quality coffee possible. 

Coffee in Tanzania was grown almost exclusively in the Northern part for a long time. The Kilimanjaro, Arusha, Tarime, Kagera, Kigoma and Karatu/Ngorongoro regions are known for their ideal Arabica growing conditions. At the time, coffee production was so concentrated in the north that Moshi, a northern municipality, was the only hub for all coffee milling and sales.

Operations in Moshi grew to massive proportions in the 1950s and early-1960s. Hence during the post-war decades, Tanzania, Kenya and Burundi were under British rule—Moshi was the second milling and sales hub (after Nairobi, Kenya) for British coffee production.

Coffee cultivation has extended southwards in recent years. In addition to the northern historical coffee growing regions, coffee is now also grown in the south—in Ruvuma and Mbeya/Mbozi. Most Southern expansion of coffee growing occurred in the 1970s and 1980s and was encouraged by two projects supported by European backers. In an ironic twist, today, 75 to 85% of total coffee production in Tanzania comes from farms in the south.

Coffee’s roots in Tanzania can be traced via narrative history back to the Haya tribe of Northwest Tanzania in the 16th century. Following German and then British colonial rule, the Tanzanian coffee industry has undergone many transformations and adjustments to create the most equal, profitable and high-quality coffee possible. 

Coffee in Tanzania was grown almost exclusively in the Northern part for a long time. The Kilimanjaro, Arusha, Tarime, Kagera, Kigoma and Karatu/Ngorongoro regions are known for their ideal Arabica growing conditions. At the time, coffee production was so concentrated in the north that Moshi, a northern municipality, was the only hub for all coffee milling and sales.

Operations in Moshi grew to massive proportions in the 1950s and early-1960s. Hence during the post-war decades, Tanzania, Kenya and Burundi were under British rule—Moshi was the second milling and sales hub (after Nairobi, Kenya) for British coffee production.

Coffee cultivation has extended southwards in recent years. In addition to the northern historical coffee growing regions, coffee is now also grown in the south—in Ruvuma and Mbeya/Mbozi. Most Southern expansion of coffee growing occurred in the 1970s and 1980s and was encouraged by two projects supported by European backers. In an ironic twist, today, 75 to 85% of total coffee production in Tanzania comes from farms in the south.

The lot

This fully-washed lot is a blend of peaberries from 3 different varieties- Bourbon, Kent and Typica.  Coffee is grown by smallholder farmers in the Mbozi District of the Songwe Region in Southern Tanzania. Each farmer tends to farm in between 1 and 2 hectares of land on average. 

Coffee cherries are gathered at cooperative washing stations, then selectively handpicked and then pulped on an eco-pulper. Afterwards, beans are dry fermented and then washed in clean water. 

Then the parchment is laid to dry on raised beds for approximately 14 days. In that time, parchment is raked frequently to ensure even drying. 

When the drying process is over, green beans are screened by size and form. At this processing phase, peaberries are separated from other beans. The specific size and shape of a peaberry allow them to fall through the smallest screen and separate them from other beans.

 

You may also like